Silver


The traditional gift of the 25th Anniversary

Together with gold and the platinum-group metals, silver is one of the so-called precious metals. Because of its comparative scarcity, brilliant white color, malleability, ductility, and resistance to atmospheric oxidation, silver has long been used in the manufacture of coins, ornaments, and jewelry. Silver has the highest known electrical and thermal conductivity of all metals and is used in fabricating printed electrical circuits and as a vapour-deposited coating for electronic conductors; it is also alloyed with such elements as nickel or palladium for use in electrical contacts. Silver also finds use as a catalyst for its unique ability to convert ethylene to ethylene oxide, which is a precursor of many organic compounds. Silver is one of the noblest—that is, least chemically reactive—of the transition elements.

As a metal, silver has significant health benefits that have been used across cultures for centuries. Silver has a proven track record as a powerful antimicrobial agent fighting infections and aiding in cold and flu prevention, wound healing, and more.

Silver also helps with internal heat regulation and circulation. Many have reported improvements in energy levels and balance in moods after wearing silver, as its natural properties may offset outside electrical disturbances, improve circulation and overall body temperature balance, and help maintain cleanliness and immunity.

Silver has a long history in antibiotics and sterilization, with many women and men wearing silver jewelry to stave off infection, cold/flu symptoms, and any other virus, bacteria, etc. This health benefit is one of the reasons why so many manufacturers choose to make medical devices and tools out of silver.

Silver also purportedly keeps our blood vessels elastic, which enables it to play a role in bone formation and healing, as well as skin maintenance and repair.

Finally, silver has a directly tangible benefit in helping us to avoid potentially toxic substances — as a metal, silver reacts and turns color when it encounters many other chemicals that are known toxins.













Glossary of Jewelry Terms

KT: (Karat) refers to the fineness of gold: one karat is equal to 1/24th part of pure gold in an alloy.

18KTY: 18 Karat Yellow Gold
18KTW: 18 Karat White Gold
18KTR: 18 Karat Rose Gold
14KTY: 14 Karat Yellow Gold
14KTW: 14 Karat White Gold

14KTR: 14 Karat Rose Gold

CT: (Carat)  

CTW: (Total Carat Weight) The term refers to the sum of the weights of all diamonds mounted in a piece of jewelry.

SHANK: refers to the band of the ring or the part that actually encircles your finger. Most shanks are round, but there are also square shaped-shanks and other more creative shapes.

GIA : Gemological Institute of America; known as the leading authority for gemology internationally.

GIA Color Grading Scale: The GIA scale begins with the letter D, representing colorlessness, and continues with increasing presence of color to the letter Z, representing light yellow, light brown or light gray. The 23 color grades on the GIA Color Scale (or diamond color chart) are subdivided into five subcategories, which are: colorless (D-F); near colorless (G-J); faint (K-M); very light (N-R); and light (S-Z).

GIA Diamond Clarity Scale: The GIA Diamond Clarity Scale has 6 categories, some of which are divided, for a total of 11 specific grades.

 

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